Refuge by andywon on Flickr.Often people ask me how “real” the scenery is that you can see in my images — and how much processing goes into them.
Well, I like to think of the landscapes in my photos as “dreamscapes”. They are not real in the sense that you could ever really experience them yourself. They are moments in time, chosen by my vision, captured by my camera and processed by my imagination. That’s why I never strive for realism in my landscape photography. Even if you take the premise that the photos represent my exact vision at the time (which they don’t), you could never experience it the same way because everyone has another way of receiving the world around him or her. That’s also why two photos from the exact same spot, photographed at the exact same time, will never look the same (just look at Michael’s photos from this place).
I think photography is a deeply personal thing. For me the landscapes I photograph and process are more like a dream to me. It’s the dream of a better, more beautiful world which can be created from our world, if you are at the exact right moment at the exact right spot and put all your creative energy into it. Photos like this can be seen as a refuge - you can imagine being in a place like that, experiencing all its beauty, even though you know exactly that it would at best look a few fleeting minutes like this. My own approach at landscape photography is creating the most beautiful places and moments, even though we all live in a world which is full of chaos and ugliness. For me it’s about beauty and how I can find and create it with my camera and vision.                                                                      “Andreas Wonisch”

Refuge by andywon on Flickr.

Often people ask me how “real” the scenery is that you can see in my images — and how much processing goes into them.
Well, I like to think of the landscapes in my photos as “dreamscapes”. They are not real in the sense that you could ever really experience them yourself. They are moments in time, chosen by my vision, captured by my camera and processed by my imagination. That’s why I never strive for realism in my landscape photography. Even if you take the premise that the photos represent my exact vision at the time (which they don’t), you could never experience it the same way because everyone has another way of receiving the world around him or her. That’s also why two photos from the exact same spot, photographed at the exact same time, will never look the same (just look at Michael’s photos from this place).
I think photography is a deeply personal thing. For me the landscapes I photograph and process are more like a dream to me. It’s the dream of a better, more beautiful world which can be created from our world, if you are at the exact right moment at the exact right spot and put all your creative energy into it. Photos like this can be seen as a refuge - you can imagine being in a place like that, experiencing all its beauty, even though you know exactly that it would at best look a few fleeting minutes like this. My own approach at landscape photography is creating the most beautiful places and moments, even though we all live in a world which is full of chaos and ugliness. For me it’s about beauty and how I can find and create it with my camera and vision. “Andreas Wonisch”

January.11.2012
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